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Answers So Far..

  • Someone asked:
    Hello 🙂 I also run the 400m and I personally find the hardest part is actually learning how to run the race, I always find I push too hard in the first part and I have nothing left at the end. I was wondering how you break down the race? For example when do you stop accelerating and relax into the race and when do you start to push hard for the finish?
    • Laviai replied:
      Hi, Thank you for your question. I think the 400m is a very difficult event to master, and one we all have to be respectful of. If you watch any major 400m finals, you'll find that the athletes will each run their race quite differently to one another. Each of their race plans are dependent on each's own strengths and weaknesses. Now, I'm not a coach, and I've only learnt what I have about the 400m firstly through my coaches and their plans for me, secondly, by watching 400m races over the years, and thirdly, through my own trial and error. So I can only really give you my personal thoughts. If you feel that you push too hard in the beginning stages, perhaps try relaxing between 100m and 200m (the backstraight) and maintaining a relaxed effort all the way through. For me, I stop accelerating once I get into the back straight, and I try to stay relaxed all the way through to the finish. I've found that my best races are the ones where I've maintained a relaxed effort, without having to try too hard. Hope this helps! xoxo
  • Someone asked:
    Hey Laviai, I’ve just read your blogpost about nutrition. I’m a nutritionist who’s currently studying for a master’s degree sports and nutrition. I have to say, I really liked reading your blog post! Just one thing I would like to ask. You said ‘Research has shown that by ensuring you have a regular hit of protein throughout the day, you body has enough to repair itself throughout the night.’ It’s possible you meant this, but the message is not clear for me. During the night you can’t consume proteins and so you miss out a big protein feeding opportunity. Therefore it’s important to consume some casein (slow digestion protein) before you go to bed to stimulate overnight muscle protein synthesis rates, thereby improving muscle reconditioning during overnight sleep. You may have meant this by saying you should have a regular hit of protein throughout the day, but it may be useful to mention the importance of pre-sleep protein. Further, I’m not a big fan of vit C during training periods because they blunt training adaptations, but like you said, this is very personal. 😉 Jolien
    • Laviai replied:
      Hi Jolien, Thanks for the comment. You do make a very interesting point. I’ve worked with my nutritionist who mentioned the importance of consuming regular hits of protein throughout the day, and he has also mentioned the benefits of casein before sleep, (and whey after training etc) and I am aware of the differences between proteins, but for this particular post, I was focusing on introducing some things around nutrition, rather than going into detail just yet. In the future, I think I will write a specific post about protein in itself, (and possibly another one on supplements) because I have so much to say on these topics. With vitamin c, personally, I have a very weak immune system and when training really hard, I have vulnerable periods in which I’m most likely to become ill or run down, so for me, the benefits outweigh the negatives. But again, as I mentioned in the post, it’s all about finding what’s right for you! Thanks for the comment, I appreciate the feedback! Laviai x
  • Someone asked:
    What is your weight ?
    • Laviai replied:
      It fluctuates throughout the year, it's usually between 56-60kg.